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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
say greece? >> host: what does it mean for the pentagon? >> guest: any program, how did you continue? greece used to be one of the only three great non-u.s. countries, spending about 2% of gdp on national security. we were spending fortified at the time. we are under four. responding to something. they are now below that and having even further south because they simply can't afford it. >> host: new jersey, democratic collar. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. first of all, i am a retired army colonel, executive and also an author. adelle lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. no part today in a problem. a problems exist for three principal reasons. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund. second, we had a huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stop paying taxes and start drawing welfare. number three, we have the tax cuts, both the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which
and to move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it's interesting that we talk about the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked
in very significant fiscal problems. france has to be the poster child, although maybe greece, i guess, would take number wunsch. >> but we do know that the u.s. spends a larger percentage of its gdp on health care than any of the other developed nations by a fairly significant amount. so really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue. and we should be focused on that, i think, much more than the federal government's portion of it. and in this case where you have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to health care is taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending equals medicare costs and, again, as somebody who actually ran the program, i'm not assuming that. >> you want to do that one? sure. >> dade, this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this: what scoreable savings proposals does aarp support for medicare beyond just better care coordination? does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and b cost sharing or me
greece. at some point the american people are going to say, enough. every american family has to balance their budget. every american family has to make tough decisions. why don't we make some tough decisions, if we want to have things paid for like weather capabilities, like amtrak, like replace federal assets, buying vehicles when we have 660,000 vehicles in the inventory. why don't we start making tough decisions. i often mention that the approval rating that we have of the american people is rather interestingly low. the last one i saw was i 11% approval. no wonder -- no wonder. we're about -- in a matter of literally hours -- to spend about $60 billion of the american taxpayers' money, estimates of some is that it should be around $24 billion. without hearings, without the kinds of scrutiny that it deserves and the normal appropriations process. and i understand why we need some of this money in emergency fashion. but it's like the train leaving the station. it's loaded up with pork, and it's moving and so everybody wants to get on board. it's not the way that the congress should do
do to improve the fate of our country so we will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agre
they got a tax credit for hiring people if we get this under control so we are not talking about greece and we are not talking ourselves to death. the fiscal sanity then yes, why, because we have markets for products and services i predicted at that point that act would be right where we are are going to be at the end of this year. we had a year-and-a-half to come and work together and build a bridge so that we wouldn't fall off the cliff. and what did we do? electioneered waiting until they are over. when he elections are more important than governing this country coming to get into the trouble that we are in. it's not just wild spending. it's not just tax loopholes. it's about governing and fiscally managing things as you go along. and it doesn't just have to be in the white house, it has to be in congress as well. >> given the frustrations in the process, if a grandchild can to you and said i want to go into politics, would you be discouraging of their intent? >> i would be straight forward with them. when i decided i wanted to run for governor, somebody asked me if my skill was big
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
maybe greece would take number one. >> we to know that the u.s. spends a larger percentagpercentag e of gdp on health care than any other developed nation by fairly significant amount. really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue and we should be focused on that much more than the federal government's portion of it and in this case we have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to help her, taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending with medicare costs and again as somebody usa ran the program -- [inaudible] >> this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this. what scorable savings proposal does aarp support or for medicare, beyond better coordination does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and beet are sharing our medigap reform or anything else? >> i think it's important to remind everybody that we recently had a large health care bill called the affordable care act which include $720 billion in medicare sa
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)